Letters to the Editor for Oct. 20, 2015

Planning for the future, and sticking to the plan

Re: Deja Views, October 06:

First, thanks to Beach Metro News, David Van Dyke, and I must mention Gene Domagala for keeping such close track of our Beach history. I was particularly interested in this photo because David mentioned that it is hard to believe that 47 years have passed since it was taken in 1968.

One thing has not changed at all. The streetcar is still there along with the overhead wires both for the streetcar and the power for all of the area. The plan in the 1960s was to progressively remove all overhead wires and put them underground. If we had eliminated all of the overhead wires and the streetcar as was planned, the ice storms would have caused almost no disruption. We are lucky that the recent ice storms did not do more damage than they did. If all of those wooden poles break off – and they could – the power will be off for a long, long time while all of the poles and wires are rebuilt.

As it is now, the Queen Subway, which was planned to be built in the seventies, may have to be built as an emergency project. Severe crowding on the Yonge line may eventually force us to build it to allow people to get to the Bloor-Danforth line without going through the overloaded Yonge-Bloor station.

Just think if we did not have to worry about closing Queen Street for events like the Easter Parade because we had a subway to bring people in. I know a lot of people will say we cannot afford to build the Queen Subway now, but we may be forced to eventually because of crowding on both the Queen streetcar and the Yonge subway.

Why is it that people ask what happened to planning so far-sighted as leaving a space under the Bloor Viaduct in 1918 for a subway? The subway was built in the early 1960s, roughly 50 years after the viaduct. We left a station at Queen in 1954 but everybody has forgotten about that. We were planning for the future in the 1960s too, but the plans were turned down by our city council in 1972 when they voted to stop all subway construction and ordered the streetcars we have now.

I think we should look a little further into the future when we plan, and then not scrap the plans.

John Bailes

P.Eng., senior engineer

 

Ditch parking fees at annual event

I have watched, with disappointment, for the past three years as parents and spectators have come to watch as our local elementary children gather at Woodbine Beach to run cross country. The parking lot at the restaurant at Woodbine Beach, which is usually open to the public at this time of year, suddenly has gated paid parking on these days. Really? Would a good community business not graciously let the limited amount of parking fees collected go and add support to a great event?

Lynda Hurley

 

The broad meaning of “broadening ownership”

Re: Broadening Hydro One ownership, In My Opinion, October 6:

Only a politician could coin the euphemism “broadening of ownership” when they mean selling off of the now publicly owned Hydro One. How much more broad can the ownership be than every citizen of Ontario?

If the Ontario government is so short of funds, they should be more careful with the money they already raise from us in taxes.

Michael Ufford

Glenside Avenue

 

Animal hospital helps final farewell

We lived in the Beach for a number of years but have since moved to Leslieville. Some of our Beach relationships are those that will last a lifetime – in particular, one with the Boardwalk Animal Hospital.

From our first visit with our dogs, Twigs and Charlie, we knew that this place was special. Within our first year, our dear Shih Tzu, Twigs, became sick. Dr. James Young and staff helped us through her illness and the sadness of saying goodbye.

Move forward a couple years and Charlie, our loved Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, fell over and was paralyzed.  He was diagnosed with a cervical myelopathy. Additionally, his right cruciate ligament was ruptured and a partial tear was found in his left. Charlie underwent physiotherapy for his paralysis at ARC Rehab and once strong enough, underwent surgery at the VEC to fix his ligament. Lo and behold, our dog would wag his tail and walk again.

Under the dedicated care and follow up of Dr. Young, Charlie was progressing and doing well. He underwent another surgery for his left cruciate and bounced back.

He was left with arthritis, which we managed with meds. His tail never stopped wagging.

Then came Cushing’s disease, bouts of pancreatitis, deafness, and his arthritis was getting worse. He was slowing down. His tail still wagged and he was as cuddly as ever. Throughout the three years, Dr. Young and staff were attentive, knowledgable and absolutely wonderful with helping us deal with Charlie’s issues. They explained everything so we could understand, always accommodated us and were kind. Not once did they try to push something on us that was not necessary.

Recently Charlie became lethargic and slowed right down. He began having seizures. He lost the sparkle in his eyes, his wagging tail slowed and long story short, we knew it was time to say goodbye. Dr. Young and his technicians helped us through our final farewell with patience, grace and dignity. As they did with Twigs, they cast Charlie’s paw and gave it to us. They also made a donation to the Ontario Veterinary College Pet Trust in recognition of our loving relationship with Charlie.

Words cannot express our gratitude for all the staff at the Boardwalk Animal Hospital. This is an exceptional team. Every single staff member needs to be commended for their daily display of professionalism, graciousness, knowledge and compassion. In the most difficult circumstances, this is magnified ten-fold and for that, we will always be grateful.

Nancy Brambilla


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