Endangered exhibit at Connections Gallery on Danforth Avenue highlights heritage areas, coastlines at risk

Endangerd, featuring works by photographers Monica Glitz and Phillip Jessup, is now on at the Connections Gallery on Danforth Avenue.

Toronto photographers Monica Glitz and Phillip Jessup showcase archaeological and natural landscapes that are at risk from climate change and development in their show Endangered which takes place at the Connections Gallery on Danforth Avenue.

The show runs until Dec. 31 and an opening reception is planned for the evening of Nov. 15 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the gallery, which is located at 1840 Danforth Ave., between Coxwell and Woodbine avenues.

Both Glitz and Jessup bring a wealth of photography experience to the show which features photos of of a number of UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) World Heritage Sites and significant coastal marshlands that are threatened by rising sea levels, tourism and neglect.

Glitz has been documenting UNESCO World Heritage Sites for the past 20 years, and Jessup has a decade of experience documenting landscapes that are vanishing due to climate change.

In Endangered, Glitz’s photography looks at a number of important UNESCO sites worldwide that are in various stages of conservation and restoration.

Jessup’s photography features his works from three important coastal marshlands: the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve in Mexico; the Great Marsh in Massachusetts, and the Mandalay Wildlife Refuge in Louisiana.

For more on the Endangered exhibit, please visit www.alternativephotoservices.com/connections-gallery


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